Donations Archives - East Cheshire Hospice

What Women Want Return

Five friends who call themselves What Women Want are back in business planning events after Covid curtailed their fundraising.

A glitzy ball at Cranage Hall on Friday, November 12, is already sold out assuming restrictions have ended fully by then.

The group has still managed to carry on fundraising for East Cheshire Hospice during the pandemic, although on a much smaller scale because of government limitations.

One of the group Jo Millward raised £1,300 after running a half marathon last month after injury forced her to delay her challenge.

 

Jo Millward completing her half marathon in aid of East Cheshire Hospice.

 

Meanwhile, fellow member Jill Harding is undertaking a wing walk on Monday, June 21, in aid of the Hospice where she is a health care assistant.

Jill fell in love with the Hospice after her late mum Mary was a patient there 18 years ago.

Group chair Jayne Carter said: “All the tickets have gone for the Ball if it’s allowed to go ahead.  We’re just waiting on Boris Johnson’s announcement on June 21 and are thinking of calling it the Masked Ball since we’ve all been wearing masks.

“Our disco bingo nights at Tytherington School usually attract 200 people but we’re not sure whether they can go ahead yet.

“It’s been hugely frustrating and we all feel really sorry that we haven’t been able to raise much-needed funds.

“We’ve organised online raffles and had a couple of meetings, but have missed doing big events which is hard when the Hospice needs the money.

“It’s been a difficult time for them and we’re a bit detached from it all as we’ve been unable to go in to the Hospice.

“We may not make as much money from the Ball, especially as we were lucky enough to get a massive £1m donation from sponsors Proseal a couple of years ago, but this time it’ll be much more about raising the profile of the Hospice and having fun again.”

Elaine Burgess and Julie Barnes make up the Macclesfield quintet who have been fundraising for the Hospice for 13 years.

Jill has already raised £1,590 for her wing walk at an airfield in Gloucestershire. To sponsor her visit www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Jill-Harding2.

What Women Want made a £25,000 donation to help launch the Hospice @Home service in 2017 and later bought a car for staff to visit patients at home.

The group has also bought equipment and many other practical items for the Hospice.

 

What Women Want fundraisers (from left) – Jo Millward, Julie Barnes, Jill Harding, Jayne Carter and Elaine Burgess

Vaccine Workers Donate to Hospice

Several workers helping with the mass vaccine roll-out at Andrews Pharmacy are donating their wages to charity.

They include two couples with strong links to nearby East Cheshire Hospice which is benefitting from their generosity.

Teacher Angela Raval is a Hospice ambassador, while Margaret Black is a part-time health care assistant, having rejoined the nursing register to take on a vaccinator role.

Both have worked many hours at the pharmacy, as have husbands Neil Raval and Sandy Black whose roles include helping the operation run smoothly.

Neil, a management consultant, said: “Angela’s role at the Hospice means we’re acutely aware of the difficulty charities are facing.

“We’ve been at the pharmacy in rain, hail, snow and occasional sunshine and the feedback is it’s a friendly, efficient service.”

The Ravals split their donation between several charities, including sponsoring Hospice health care assistant Jill Harding, a friend and fellow dog walker, for her wing walk last month.

 

Angela and Neil Raval.

 

Neil is scout network commissioner for Macclesfield and Congleton district and proud of the organisation’s support role at the pharmacy.

Sandy is a retired health and safety manager at AstraZeneca, while Margaret was a Hospice nurse.

Sandy said: “We’ve enjoyed helping at the clinic supporting people through the vaccination process. The elderly were thankful to receive the vaccine and it’s been rewarding from that aspect.

“Donating our wages to the Hospice was the obvious thing for us to do. We’ve done various things to support the charity and know friends who’ve needed its support.”

 

Margaret and Sandy Black.

Hide a Smile’s Fundraising Face Coverings

Voluntary group Hide a Smile could not stop grinning after raising £6,188 making face coverings.

The donations to East Cheshire Hospice are being collected at Prestbury Village Pharmacy where masks are still available to buy.

Some 19 sewing enthusiasts joined a WhatsApp group after founder Sheila MacLaren spread the word on social media over a year ago that virus protection was needed.

 

Hide a Smile members (from left) Sue Matykiewicz, Sheila MacLaren and Caroline Harrison-Croft with pharmacist David Wood.

 

Sheila, a semi-retired structural engineer, said: “I blew the dust off my sewing machine and we started off making scrubs for clinical staff before concentrating on face coverings.

“Fabric was donated and Covid restrictions meant we had pick-up and drop-off points to keep the production line in full swing.”

Pharmacist David Wood and his staff gave out 1,200 coverings in return for an average donation of £5 to a collection box.

He said: “It’s a great community story borne out of necessity at a time when there were no masks or even hand gel.

“As a community pharmacy, it was a natural place to distribute masks, especially as there weren’t many other shops open.”

Volunteer Caroline Harrison-Croft, who owned a garment design company, said:  “I’ve always sewn and it was pretty boring at first during lockdown so I was delighted to help. The masks are washable and environmentally friendly.”

Another volunteer Sue Matykiewicz said: “Our group still haven’t met up yet. We’d like to thank everyone for their efforts and those who donated to support the Hospice.”

Hide a Smile also made coverings for pupils at Fallibroome Academy.

 

Hide a Smile volunteer  Judy Biggin wearing one of the coverings she made.

2021 Christmas Tree Collection Total

The Christmas tree collection in aid of East Cheshire Hospice raised a record £150,000 this year.

Delighted co-founder of the scheme Richard Raymond said: “It’s our 21st year, so we’ve come of age with a bang.”

Around 1,000 trees were collected over three days last month once lockdown restrictions were eased – a sixth of the trees that would have been recycled had the collection not been postponed from January.

Most donors got rid of trees themselves and some who had not even registered also made donations.

The funds are enough to provide palliative care for three weeks at the Hospice which needs £7,500 a day to keep its doors open.

 

Tree collection co-founders Richard Raymond (left) and Pete Chapman.

 

Richard said: “We did get some bemused looks as we carried dead old brown Christmas trees at the end of April, but it gave us the opportunity to tell people about the collection and the Hospice.

“People knew about the plight of charities and the Hospice, in particular, because of Covid-19 and they were even more generous with their donations this year with the average amount donated per tree going up.

“It’s a wonderful indication of the community in which we serve that people put their hands so deep into their pockets. Their generosity is quite overwhelming and we thank them sincerely.”

Richard and fellow co-founder Pete Chapman will now get a break of a couple of months before they start planning the next collection in January 2022.

 

Volunteer Mel Curwen helps out during the Christmas tree collection.

Neptune Shop Donates Flower Display

Patients at East Cheshire Hospice are the latest to enjoy a beautiful floral display which helped bring a splash of colour to Knutsford town centre.

The arrangement now has pride of place in the lush Hospice gardens which provide a relaxing haven for patients and visitors.

The flowers were donated by new furniture, kitchen and home interiors store Neptune Knutsford which created a week-long display on Princess Street, by St John’s Parish Church, to spread a touch of happiness amid the Covid gloom.

Each of the company’s 27 stores nationwide took part in a campaign called #lovelytoseeyouagain  with the flowers, placed in barrels, then donated to a local good cause.

Neptune, which recently opened its newest store on Chelford Road, Ollerton, chose the Hospice in Macclesfield as the flowers’ final destination.

Neptune Knutsford Store Leader Joanna Makant said: “Neptune placed the displays close to each of our stores with the aim of bringing a little cheer and joy after what everyone’s gone through.

“The flowers were something for passers-by to enjoy and we’re delighted they’re now being appreciated by patients at East Cheshire Hospice.

“It’s a lovely charity and covers the area of many of our customers.  The garden there is so pretty  and is overlooked by rooms on the ward, allowing patients and visitors to sit outside and enjoy the scenery. The flowers are artificial so will have a much longer life.”

Neptune Knutsford opened in November 2020 and sells beautiful furniture for the kitchen, dining room, living room, bedroom and bathroom as well as home accessories.

The Hospice is the second-lowest funded in the country, receiving only 17 per cent of income from government. The charity, which costs £7,500 a day to run, provides care for patients with life-limiting illnesses, their families and carers, free of charge.

Neptune Knutsford Store Leader Joanna Makant (left) and East Cheshire Hospice Chief Executive Karyn Johnston with the floral display at the Hospice.

Anna Rains Stresses the Importance of Legacies

A long-standing East Cheshire Hospice supporter has made an emotional plea for the public to help with legacies.

Grandmother Anna Rains said gifts from wills are a vital source of revenue for the Hospice.

In her new role as ambassador, Anna is offering to give talks to community groups, stressing the importance of legacies and sharing Hospice anecdotes.

She said: “I’m trying to appeal to people’s sympathies and make them realise how important it is and what it’d be like if we didn’t have a hospice in this area.

“People would either die at home without a lot of help, or in hospital. However, the Hospice is there for us and Hospice @Home is marvellous.

“We need more money coming in and only get a small portion of our income from the government. We’re the second lowest funded Hospice in the country.

“We’re just asking people when making, or updating, a will to please think about the Hospice.

“We’re not a national charity and can’t put big advertisements on television, saying ‘please leave something in your will.’ We must do it on a much smaller scale.”

Anna has made a legacy to the Hospice in her will, like husband Michael who died almost two years ago, aged 96.

The couple were married for 37 years and got involved in fundraising for the charity soon after it opened in 1988.

Anna set up Art Fair Cheshire and was chair of the Hospice 10th Anniversary Fundraising Appeal to build the Sunflower Centre.

Family and friends have also been Hospice patients.

She said: “Michael’s first wife died there, as did his brother and my sister. It’s a most extraordinary and happy place.

“Someone who didn’t know what to expect when walking through the front door said it felt like being given a big hug and knowing you weren’t on your own.

“There are more young people coming into the Hospice with life-limiting illnesses than I thought. We take patients from 18 yet most people consider the Hospice as a place where older people go to die with a serious illness.

“I’ve done a lot of public speaking over the years and jumped at the chance to become an ambassador in this way. I’m 78 now and felt it was time to do a bit more for the Hospice.”

Anna Rains at the Art Fair she set up.

Leaving a Legacy for the Hospice

Legacy gifts make up about a third of East Cheshire Hospice’s fundraising income.

Donors usually leave either a fixed amount, or a percentage of their estate, in their will.

The absence of major fundraising events over the last year because of Covid-19 has left the Hospice struggling for income even more.

Beth England, Individual Giving Fundraiser, said: “We’re here to look after you and your loved one, should you ever need us and understand more than most how important family is.

“Therefore once you’ve looked after your family in your will, we ask you to consider leaving a gift to the Hospice.

“Such a gift is a big decision but it’s one that makes a very real and lasting difference to the lives of people affected by life-limiting illness, long into the future.

“The past year has shown without doubt that we can’t predict the future and the need for our care is only growing.

“Your support through a gift in your will, will help future generations access our vital care. We can’t even begin to express how much we appreciate every legacy gift that we receive.

“It’s so special to know that someone has trusted us to continue their legacy through the work we do in the community.”

* For more information about legacies contact Beth England at legacies@echospice.org.uk.

Beth England, Individual Giving Fundraiser at East Cheshire Hospice.

Barbara Horry

Harold Horry only spent 15 hours as a patient at East Cheshire Hospice but it was long enough to leave a lasting impression on his family.

They have never forgotten the care the former AstraZeneca employee received in those final precious hours before he died in 2012, aged 86.

So much so that wife Barbara has donated proceeds from a book of family memoirs to the Hospice as a thank you.

The hardback, entitled The Mad Midwife of Mobberley, was written by granddaughter Lydia, a keen writer.

It is an affectionate account of Barbara’s nursing experiences over almost 40 years and was Lydia’s present to celebrate her grandmother’s 90th birthday in November.

Barbara Horry with her book of family memoirs.

The Mad Midwife of Mobberley, written by Barbara’s granddaughter Lydia.

Family and friends bought copies for £10, raising £350 for the Hospice where Barbara admits she would have liked to have worked.

Harold was a leading figure in the scouting movement, spending 20 years as Alderley’s district commissioner. Barbara has raised more than £200,000 for the scouts over five decades.

Harold worked in package design for ICI and later AZ, spending more than 50 years with the company, based at Alderley Park and then Macclesfield.

Barbara said: “Fortunately, the Hospice found a bed for Harold and we just managed to get him there from the hospital in Manchester in time. He arrived after lunchtime and died early the next morning.

“He was only there for 15 hours but we were so grateful for the care he received in that short time.

“The Hospice do a wonderful job and I admire the work they do there not only for patients, but also for the families who’re so well looked after as well.

“We were so grateful for the Hospice’s compassion and understanding during our time of grief and will never forget their kindness.

“Lydia enjoys books and writing and her book contains tales of funny incidents in my life, including my early experiences as a district nurse and midwife.

“It’s been popular with family and friends and we’re all glad to have raised money for the Hospice which will always be close to our hearts.”

Barbara celebrating her 90th birthday.

Rearranging the Christmas Tree Collection

Does anyone still have a Christmas tree that needs collecting?

True to its word East Cheshire Hospice is keeping a promise to pick up trees registered under its collection scheme.

The service had to be postponed once Cheshire went back into lockdown at the start of the year.

The vast majority of donors refused the offer of a refund to help the Hospice financially.

Some even contributed even though they were not among more than 6,000 registrations for the tree collection.

The collection is now scheduled for the week of April 19 following the easing of restrictions, though plans would be reviewed if the government road map out of lockdown changes.

The team are contacting supporters asking if they still have a tree for collection. A date will be arranged that week once numbers and locations are known.

Staff at the Ansa recycling plant in West Park in 2019.

Community Fundraiser Carley Macey said: “It’s impossible to tell at this point how many remaining trees need collecting. That’s why we’re sending out an email to figure out how many vans and volunteers we need.

“If you no longer need your tree collecting please do nothing and we’ll assume that anyone who doesn’t complete the form no longer requires collection.

“We want to thank everyone for their patience. This has been an extremely difficult situation for the collection organisers, volunteers and the Hospice. With so many people involved in making the collection happen, the safety of everyone must be our top priority.”

Christmas Tree Collection team are aware that 66 people have disposed of their own tree so far.  The delayed collection is for trees already registered and no new registrations can be taken.

Supporters’ generosity means the tree campaign alone has already paid for 20 days of care so far. It costs £7,500 a day for the charity to provide its services free of charge.

Carley said: “We received such an encouraging response when we announced our decision to postpone.

“While we did receive some requests for a refund, we also saw such generosity from our community from additional donations made towards the collection and the Hospice.

“We’re so incredibly grateful and humbled by these gestures and while we celebrate the amount raised, it also puts into perspective the funds we need to generate all the time.”

* To get your registered tree collected, or make a donation, visit www.echtrees.org.uk

Volunteers before the2020 Christmas tree collection.

Donations for Postponed Christmas Tree Collection

East Cheshire Hospice is hoping the public will let it keep donations made for the Christmas tree collection.

Refunds are available – or trees will be collected once lockdown eventually ends – but the Hospice hopes supporters will help ease its financial plight by not asking for donations to be returned.

However, it says it quite understands if people prefer a refund because trees cannot be collected on the weekend originally specified.

A Hospice statement said: “If you would like us to keep your kind donation towards the collection, you don’t need to do anything, and we thank you so much as this will make a real difference at this difficult time.

“If you would still like your tree to be collected on the re-arranged date, you don’t need to do anything, we will be in touch closer to the time with more information about this once a new date is safe and possible.

“If you would like a refund for your donation towards the Christmas tree collection campaign, please notify us by completing the form on our website.

“Please note, if we don’t hear from you to request a refund, your kind donation will be gratefully accepted and will make a real difference at this difficult time.

“Thank you for your continued support.”

To find out more about the postponed collection click here.

The recycling operation at an East Cheshire Hospice Christmas tree collection.